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Regional Cuisine

Foods from different regions

Jul 292014
 
Maque Choux Soup

 

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Hello and welcome to my dining room where I present the next course of the Progressive Eats – This is the e – version of Progressive Dinners of yore.  Carefully planned and brought to fruition  by Barb at Creative-Culinary.   As in the days past, when people would get together for a meal and move from home to home for different courses; we are getting together  to throw a virtual progressive dinner party and invite our readers to come join us in this fun event.  The only difference is, you will be moving home to home in different cities!  To kick off the party, Lana at Never Enough Thyme is hosting the  “Summer in the South”.  Let’s get to know rest of the party people!

Main Course
Never Enough Thyme – Creole Style Smothered Chicken
Appetizers
The Heritage Cook – Old Bay Shrimp Boil Skewers
Stetted – Fried Green Tomatoes with Smoked Tomato Basil Aioli
Bread
Savvy Eats – Jalapeno Cornbread + How to Store Cornbread
Salads
Miss in the Kitchen – Creamy Coleslaw
Life’s a Feast – Shrimp, Grilled Peach and Quinoa Salad
Soup
Spiceroots – Maque Choux Soup
Sides
Creative Culinary – Bacon and Caramelized Onion Creamed Corn
Pastry Chef Online – Spicy Succotash
Beverage
Healthy. Delicious. – Watermelon Lemonade
Desserts
Barbara Bakes – Key Lime Pound Cake
That Skinny Chick Can Bake – Banana Cream Cheesecake Pie

 

Maque Choux Soup

Maque Choux is a traditional Louisiana dish said to have been passed down by the Native Americans. Though Maque choux is great as a side dish, the Maque choux soup is perfect for the days when there is a slight nip in the air. As with all traditional dishes, the dish seems to have been created to use up all the seasonal produce in summer, corn being the main one.

The key to making a good Maque Choux is to use fresh corn, the freshest you can get.  It makes a world of difference to the depth of flavor in the soup since fresh corn is naturally sweet.

IMG_9020

Since  cooking  Southern Cuisine is an unchartered area for me I relied on various internet searches to find out more about my chosen dish – The Maque choux Soup. I was intrigued by the name, which incidentally is pronounced as “Mock shoe” . It is said that the dish is a result of  fusion between cuisines of the Acadian French (Cajuns), and Native Americans. (source :- WiseGeek )

The traditional way to  cook  it is by scrapping of the corn kernels from the cob and then squeezing out the milk which adds in a smoothness to the dish.  The slight charring added a smokiness and the bacon on top was just the thing that my daughter needed to feel that it was a special dish. I made this with a vegetable broth, but you can make it in a chicken broth as well and add some bacon bits while simmering for a more “meat lover” kind of soup.

Want to  participate in Progressive Eats or just want to know more about it? Find out what you need to know on Barb’s site here on her Progressive Eats Page

 

Maque Choux Soup

Serves: 4

Maque Choux Soup

Ingredients

  • 3 fresh corn ears, kernels scraped
  • 1 medium-size orange bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 tbs cornstarch
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup yogurt/ sour cream (room temperature)
  • 2-3 cups of Vegetable broth
  • Suggestions for toppings - cooked bacon, fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, Cilantro leaves, fresh lime juice, charred corn kernels

Instructions

  1. Stir together the corn kernels and peppers.
  2. Place a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add half of corn mixture and stir.
  3. Cook until the vegetables begin to char. Transfer mixture to a medium saucepan.
  4. Add remaining corn mixture to skillet; cook, stirring constantly, until vegetables begin to char. Stir in cumin and coriander and cook until fragrant.
  5. Now add 1 cup broth to corn mixture in saucepan, and process with a handheld blender until smooth.
  6. Add in the remaining corn mixture and 1- 2 Cups of broth to saucepan; bring to a slow simmer over medium heat. Add salt and cayenne and let it simmer for at least 5 minutes.
  7. Whisk the yogurt and add it in. Be sure to first temper the yogurt a bit by placing it in a heat proof dish and adding some hot soup to it and mix. This will make the yogurt less like to split when added to the soup. Alternately, add the sour cream or yogurt on top when serving.
  8. Add cornstarch to some water and add the mixture to soup. Simmer, stirring occasionally, 2-3 minutes or until thickened.

Notes

Recipe Adapted from :- Southern Living

http://www.spiceroots.com/2014/07/maque-choux-soup/

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May 172014
 
Monji Achar - KohlRabi Pickle

Kohl Rabi Pickle

While most of the world was making something sweet for the Mother’s day and indulging in creamy decadent desserts, the scene at our home was the opposite. It was a day of savory indulgences and a day of “Home Spa”. My daughter’s idea of making me have a great mother’s day was to have her Dad cook up a storm of savory things while she presented me with the make up supplies and a “gift certificate” to redeem. The gift Certificate read, – “Personalized make up services by Shloka”.

I am NOT a make up person. I just don’t have the skills or the patience to apply all things make up. My biggest make up achievement is applying an eye liner in a straight line without smudges and that too happens on rare occasions. So it was hard to let the teen do her thing on my face. But I did. Hard as it was to sit and let her enjoy the havoc she was playing on my face. But she was having fun and I think Mothers all over the world enjoy that the most. When the kids are happy and content – the moms are happy and content. I would sum it up as a nice mother’s day celebration, despite the ‘mismatched makeuped’ eyes ;)

Exquisite Make up ;)

Exquisite Make up ;)

As has become the tradition for our home, We start by celebrating and remembering my Mom by making or eating a dish that she loved making or eating. It is a ritual that comforts me and my daughter as we both miss her so very much. It comforts us to remember her by the loving memories she left behind. So for this Mother’s day, we enjoyed my Mom’s favorite pickle dish – The Monji Achar – Kohl Rabi Pickles in Mustard Oil.

Kohlrabi is from the Brassica oleracea family of veggies. I always find it at Sprouts and Whole Foods just when spring begins. I have also spotted it in Asian Grocery stores and Farmer’s Markets. While I have never had to explain what I was buying to the farmer ( it would be so wrong if they didn’t know what they had farmed, wouldn’t it?) or to the checkout person at the Asian grocery, I always have gotten weird, cross eyed, confused look at the local grocery and at The Whole Foods.

Kohl Rabi Pickle-4

To give some credit to the Whole Foods checkout person, he/she usually just scans it after the confused look and tries hard to maintain the faux impression that they know everything about what they sell. The people at the local grocery store however range from confused looks to asking a co worker, calling the manager or sometimes simply asking me, “do you know what this is called?” I have learned my lesson. I usually just tell them  the PLU code and then inform them that the produce is known by the name Kohl Rabi.

Kohl Rabi Pickle

 

Sometimes someone goes to the extent of asking, “ So what do you do with it?” Despite having a deep urge to tell them the obvious, “Well! We eat it”, I usually go on a long lecture mode to explain how many ways we can cook it and the general nutritional benefits of a simple, unassuming Kohlrabi. Needless to say, if my daughter or the spouse are with me, they leave the area without a trace or sound. They disown me in the moment! It’s happened far too many times – so much that my daughter asks me in advance if I am going to buy any “unusual” produce when she comes along for grocery shopping.

Kohlrabi pickle

This is the single most important vegetable after the “Haakh” (Greens) in Kashmiri cuisine. We love it in more ways than we can tell. So today I am sharing the much loved Monji Achar! This was my mom’s favorite pickle.

Kohl Rabi Pickle-5

The Kohlrabi is a mild tasting vegetable, even though it is from the Brassica family. It’s sweet tasting with a crunchy texture. The fermentation with spices and the preservation with the salt and oil makes this pickle a real treat to eat. Crunchy with just a hint of tartness. It is mostly eaten with plain rice, a dish of haakh and yogurt.

Monji Achar – Kohlrabi Pickles in Mustard Oil

Monji Achar – Kohlrabi Pickles in Mustard Oil

You will need a clean and sanitized glass or ceramic jar to make the pickle in. Mason Jars work really well.

Ingredients

  • 6 medium Kohlrabi with greens
  • 2 Tbs Brown Mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp Ajwain/ Bishop's weed
  • 4 tbs Cayenne/Kashmiri Chilli powder/ chilli powder
  • 1 1/2 C Mustard Oil
  • 3 tsp Salt
  • 1/4th tsp Asafetida

Instructions

  1. Wash and pat dry the Kohlrabi along with the greens.
  2. Separate the greens from the Kohlrabi and cut them into halves.
  3. Use a salad spinner to completely dry out any remaining moisture from the leaves, then as an additional precaution, spread them on a paper towel for a couple of hours to dry up further.
  4. once the greens are dry, wrap them in a fresh paper towel and store them inside the vegetable compartment, until needed.
  5. Peel and cut the kohlrabi into medium sized cubes. Spread them onto a paper towel or a kitchen cloth and leave them in the sun for a few hours, until the moisture dries up a bit and the edges look slightly shriveled.
  6. Remember- we are not sun drying them. We are using the heat from the sun to partially remove the moisture from the kohlrabi.
  7. Coarsely grind the mustard seeds and ajwain using a spice grinder. You don't need a fine powder of these spices, so just give them one whiz in the machine.
  8. Take a wide bowl and put this mix and the salt and other spices and oil into it. Mix well . Add in the kohlrabi and the greens, mix really well.
  9. Using a clean dry spoon fill the kohlrabi spice mix into a clean jar. Once you fill the jar, press it down with the spoon, to allow the oil to float on top.
  10. Cover and close the lid and leave in the sun for a few days to ferment and develop flavor. Once the Pickle acquires the required and preferred tang, store in the refrigerator to maintain the crunchiness.

Notes

1. We are keeping the greens separately inside the fridge as leaving them out will dry them out completely and they will turn yellow. 2. It takes almost a whole day for the kohlrabi to lose some of its moisture. If you are keeping it in the sun, a few hours might be enough depending on heat and atmospheric moisture on the day.

http://www.spiceroots.com/2014/05/monji-achar-kohlrabi-pickles-mustard-oil/

 

 

 

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Apr 202014
 
Khichdi

Khichdi

“Food, like a loving touch or a glimpse of divine power, has that ability to comfort.” Norman Kolpas

Nestled in Himalayas is Beautiful, Beautiful Kashmir. The place I was born and grew up in. The cuisine of the land is known for its masterfully cooked meat dishes and beautifully cooked vegetables. What it is not known for is its lentil dishes. There are some, but they are few and far in between. And Khichdi is one of them.

The Kashmiris call their Khichdi – “khechir” and it is made with whole mung, rice and choice cuts of lamb. The interesting fact is that it is eaten only once a year on the day of “Khechi Mavas” – or the day of worshipping ancient Demi Gods.

Not that you needed that kind of information, but when I get talking about my home, I get talking.

 Khichdi

Speaking of interesting – Imagine my surprise when I first moved away from home and found out that people in rest of India ate Khichdi ALL THE TIME! Ok may be not all the time. But for someone who ate it only once a year, to see people eat khichdi every now and then was amusing.

Thankfully I was introduced to a good ‘no meat’ Khichdi dish early on in my Khichdi exploring days and I was hooked. The Khichdi was the comforting dish for many of my room mates. Since we were not exactly rich and our allowance from home was limited, we could not really make a trip to the nearest restaurant on days we did not feel like eating the cafeteria food. For a nutritious, soul satisfying meal, we would fall back on khichdi.

Khichdi

Buttery lentils, gooey rice, delicious home made ghee and pickles that our moms sent in care packages were some of the things that would comfort us. It was an amusing thought for me to see myself eating a khichdi every now and then, even though it was not the food I grew up eating.

There in lies the power of simple, basic food. The nourishing aspect that makes you feel happy in your belly, the comfort it provides and the nurturing it does to your body. It is no wonder then that many cuisines have a variation of Khichdi in their cuisine.

Khichdi

Tuvar dal Khichdi  from Guajarat is an everyday food eaten with some Kadhi, pickles, papad and chutney.  Sometimes, It is also served with a spicy buttermilk drink called छाछ. In English that would be probably written as Chaach .. but it wouldn’t mean the same thing as per the dictionary. ;)

Tuvar Dal Khichdi – A Rice and Lentil dish from Gujarat

Serves: 6

Tuvar Dal Khichdi – A Rice and Lentil dish from Gujarat

Ingredients

  • 1 cup short grain white rice
  • 3/4 cup toor daal (split yellow pigeon peas)
  • 1/4 cup masoor daal (split red lentils)
  • 1/4 stick cinnamon
  • 4 to 6 whole black pepper
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 to 2 dried chili pepper
  • 3 to 4 cloves
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp red chili powder
  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Wash the rice and the daals thoroughly
  2. In a pressure cooker, heat the ghee at medium heat
  3. Add the mustard seeds and heat them until they crack and then reduce the heat
  4. Add the cloves, black pepper and cinnamon. Let them fry in the ghee a bit.
  5. Add the rice and both the lentils and stir in the spices. Mix Throughly.
  6. Add the turmeric powder, chili powder and dried red chili
  7. Add salt (about 2 tsp, but go as per your taste)
  8. Add 4 cups of water, bring it all to a rolling boil on high heat and then close the lid on the pressure cooker
  9. Once the pressure builds up in the cooker,reduce heat to medium and cook for 3 minutes under pressure. Do not let the pressure come down while you are timing it. There should be a constant and equal release of steam throughout this process. ( do check the instructions on your pressure cooker)
  10. Turn off the heat and let the the dish rest until pressure releases on its own.
  11. Serve with a big dollop of ghee, papad, chutney and some buttermilk.

Notes

The Pressure cooker used for this recipe was the Futura Brand.

http://www.spiceroots.com/2014/04/tuvar-dal-khichdi-a-rice-and-lentil-dish-from-gujarat/

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Feb 052014
 
Methi Muthia

Methi Muthia

I am on a Gujarati food spree. Gujarat is in the North -West of India and the cuisine is primarily vegetarian. The Hubz is from this region in India and his parents are visiting us and will be arriving by the end of the month.

So there! Now you know the reason behind the Gujarati food spree. I don’t get to have the in laws visit us often as they have to endure a long flight from India. So whenever they do, I like to make them feel at home and I try to imbibe as much as of their culture as I can. The cool thing about them is that they are very adventurous eaters as long as the food is vegetarian. They try all kinds of cuisines and flavors and love to travel. But once a while, I make the food from their home and the joy in their eyes makes it all worth while.

So back to Gujarati food. It is vegetarian but it is full of flavors, complexities and balance. Most of it is sweet, savory, spicy, tangy – all at the same time in various layers.

The Methi Muthia or the Fenugreek dumplings are either eaten as a snack or added to gravies and made into a main dish. These are either fried or steamed depending on how you want to use them. For today’s recipe I have fried them as I am going to make Undhiyu out of these and use them in a main dish, the recipe for which shall follow shortly. They are delicious on their own as a snack and they keep for a week in an airtight container. If you steam them, you will need to refrigerate them.

 

Methi Muthia

Ingredients

  • Ingredient
  • 2 cups fenugreek leaves (methi), finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour (aata)
  • 1/2 cup gram flour ( chick pea/ garbanzo flour)
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
  • 1/2 tsp minced green chillies (thai)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • a pinch of baking soda
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 1/2 tsp cumin powder
  • 1/2 tsp coriander powder
  • salt to taste
  • oil to fry

Instructions

  1. ake a bowl and add the fenugreek leaves in it and add 1 teaspoon of salt and mix well.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and mix well. Knead it to a soft dough ball.
  3. Make small cylindrical shaped dumplings and keep them on a plate.
  4. Heat the oil to a 365*F and fry the dumplings in batches until slightly browned and crunchy.
  5. Use a wire mesh strainer and allow the dumplings to drain and bring them to room temperature before storing to use as a snack.

Notes

Tips for frying :- Ensure you put in equal sized pieces Keep the temperature even – too hot cooks the food outside and leaves it raw within. Not the right temp enables soaking up of oil into the food and it won't fry up correctly in addition to giving you an oily product.

http://www.spiceroots.com/2014/02/methi-muthia/

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Jan 222014
 
Chiki

Chiki

The famously loved peanut chikki. It may look like a peanut brittle, but it is in fact not at all brittle. For one the ratio of the nuts to the jaggery is more and it is not hard like the brittles usually are. And secondly, the chikki is made with minimally processed sugarcane juice called the jaggery

I love the crisp yet chewier version called the chikki. There are quite a few places in India that are known to make the best tasting peanut and sesame chikki. Lonavla is considered the most famous one with the best tasting chikkis. With the latest trends landing into those otherwise very traditional artisanal domains of chikki making, we now see chikkis made of cashews, quinoa, pistachios and what not!

I am a little traditional as far as chikki is concerned. I love the two basic ones, that grandma used to handout as a treat in winters. The ones made from real “desi” Jaggery with either toasted sesame or peanuts.

The term “desi” can mean a variety of things – from something from the “des” ( native place) , or someone from India is a desi, or something that is unadulterated and probably organic is also desi. The unadulterated and organic does not apply when we refer to “desi” while talking about humans even though humans are made of organic matter after all.

 

Peanut Chikki-2So back to the jaggery of the desi kind. That is the only kind that will help you make a delectable chikki. Not the chemically processed and preserved mounds of Jaggery. So talk to your grocer and ask him/her to reveal the real jaggery. Chances are they will have a few boxes of it somewhere. The label should read “Desi Gur” or something to that effect. Made from the sap or the juice of the sugarcane or the date palm, the “gur” or jaggery is full of nutrients that the ultra processed sugar just can not provide. My friend Sangeeta has some more details on the health benefits of jaggery in this post on Jaggery Pancakes.

 

Peanut Chikki

If you are unable to find Jaggery, chances are you know it by some other names like the Panela, Piloncillo, Raspadura or Rapadura. The Brazilian Pé-de-moleque is made by mixing roasted peanuts with melted rapadura. The mixture is then stirred over heat until it mixes well and begins to crystalize. And then allowed to cool down after spreading it out on a metal plate or stone surface. Once the mixture cool, the Pe de Moleque is broken into small pieces. The whole process is similar to making the Peanut chikki in India.

Peanut or sesame chikki is traditionally eaten on the day of Makar Sankranti that falls on January 14th every year (with some exceptions). Makar Sankranti marks the transition into the warmer days and is considered a harvest festival in India.

So this Sankranti, I wanted to make the peanut chikki at home that the, finicky and snobbish about all things sweet, husband would like. So as usual, the best person to teach me about what he likes is of course his mom. So after a  frantic phone call from my side, much calming words from mother in law’s side, many happy chuckles from the father in law ( he is always pleased when I try and make traditional sweets) I set to work. Turns out I really did not need to worry. Because the only important step in the whole process was the right kind of jaggery – and that I had. I also made the process quicker by using the microwave to toast the peanuts. Easy Peasy!

Indian Peanut Chikki or The Brazilian Pé-de-moleque

Indian Peanut Chikki or The Brazilian Pé-de-moleque

Ingredients

    Peanut Chikki
  • 250 gms peanuts roasted and and outer husk removed
  • 175 gms Jaggery ( pure Jaggery)
  • 2 tsp ghee
  • 1/4 c water
  • Sesame Chikki
  • 100 gms sesame, toasted
  • 100 gms jaggery
  • 1 tsp ghee
  • 2 Tbs water

Instructions

    Advance Prep
  1. Take a 6 in baking tin or a plate and line it with a parchment. Coat the parchment paper with some ghee or oil
  2. Take a flat bottomed bowl and coat the base with ghee or oil. This will be used to press the chikki down when its hot.
  3. Peanut Chikki
  4. Begin by heating the ghee in a pan on low medium heat. Add in the jaggery. Stir and let it melt. When it melts completely and is heated through, it will start to bubble on the sides. Let it keep cooking for about a minute, then add in the water.
  5. Mix and let it come to a boil. Allow the water to evaporate completely and the jaggery to thicken again and get a darker hue. Add in the peanuts, in small batches and stir to mix and coat.
  6. Pour on the parchment paper greased with ghee, then tap it down with the base of a bowl that has been coated with ghee as well. The firmer you press the better your chiki will hold.
  7. Allow to cool and then cut.
  8. Sesame Chikki
  9. Same process as peanut chikki.
  10. Don't have roasted and husked peanuts?
  11. If you have raw shelled peanuts, you may quickly roast them in the microwave for about 2 minutes (for 250gms)
  12. and then stir. Put then in for another 2 minute in microwave. Repeat by one minute increments until you see some of the peanuts cracking in the middle. At this point let them cool.
  13. Then put them in a kitchen towel and massage them from outside the towel to remove the skin. Alternately, tie into the towel and beat the bundle on the kitchen counter. When you are done the peanuts will be separated from the skin and you will have perfect halves.
  14. How to toast the sesame seeds?
  15. Heat up a non stick pan and tip the sesame in. Gently stir and toast the sesame seeds on medium heat. As soon as the sesame seeds begin to change color, turn off heat, remove from pan and allow to cool on a baking sheet.
http://www.spiceroots.com/2014/01/indian-peanut-chikki-or-brazilian-pe-de-moleque/

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 Posted by on January 22, 2014 at 12:18 AM
Jul 182013
 
Dal Makhani

2013-07-15_12-31-35

 

 

They saw each other from a distance, walking a gentle walk on the terrace of their own homes.  Their eyes met and that was all it took to ignite a lifelong passion.  It all started one monsoon evening, in a small city called Chandigarh, in India.  There were two of them. One was young, restless and ready to take on the world.  The other was gentle, kind and had seen the world.  And they met on that fine monsoon evening.

It is because of their meeting, my dears, that you are getting to read this story and have this recipe. It is a story of kindness, compassion and a doze of neighborly love.  When they met, it turned out that the young one was a newly married woman and she had moved to this city with her husband.  The gentle and kind one was a grandmother to a few kids and had decided to retire in this city.

So they met and culture and age differences not withstanding, became the best of pals.  What connected them more was their love of different cuisines, discovering new recipes and cooking. The younger one was an eager learner, the older one a keen teacher. Together they spent afternoons after afternoons cooking dishes, discussing the nuances of each dish and finally enjoying the dishes of their labor.

One such dish that was taught during one such afternoon was the Dal Makhni.  It is a kind and gentle recipe, just like Biji .

Thank you again, Biji. This young one has finally mastered the art of  Dal Makhni just the way you taught me and am happy to share it with everyone, just like you wanted me to!

Who is Biji ( Bee GEE )? A mother like figure, who taught me the delicious choley and hundreds of other dishes from the Punjabi cuisine.

 

 

Dal Makhni – Buttery lentils

Ingredients

  • 2 C Black Gram ( Urad Dal whole)
  • 1/2 C Red Kidney Beans
  • 1/2 C finely chopped onions
  • 2 tbs garlic minced
  • 2 tbs ginger minced
  • 1 tbs Red chilli powder ( kashmiri pref)
  • 1tsp coriander powder
  • 1/2 C tomatoes
  • 2 tsp ghee
  • 2 tbs cream to serve (optional)
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tbs Mustard oil
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

    The night before (at least 12 hours before)
  1. Wash the kidney beans and the whole gram
  2. Soak them together in a bowl filled with 6 cups of water.
  3. When you are ready to cook, Drain the water, give them a quick rinse and put them in a pressure cooker with 5 cups of water.
  4. Once the water comes to a boil, skim off any foam that floats up.
  5. Add in the onions, garlic, ginger and mustard oil, close the lid and wait for it to make some noise.
  6. As soon as the steam coming out through the vent makes a noise, lower the heat to medium and let it cook for 15 minutes.
  7. Remember - medium heat.
  8. After 15 minutes, switch off heat and let the dish rest. It will release the steam on its own in about 20 minutes.
  9. Ten minutes before you are ready to serve, heat the ghee in a largish pan and add in cumin and wait for it to crackle.
  10. Add in the tomatoes and cook until the fat floats to the top. Now add in the chilli powder, coriander powder and salt.
  11. Mix it in and let it cook on a low heat for a minute.
  12. Tip in the Dal from the cooker and mix it in. You won't need to mash up the dal and you must not.
  13. Cover and cook for another 5 minutes. Serve hot with a dash of cream on top.

Notes

You add in the raw mustard oil. No need to heat it first. Seriously!

If you don't like mustard oil (too bad ) you can use any oil you choose.

http://www.spiceroots.com/2013/07/dal-makhni-buttery-lentils/

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